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The heart is the organ that supplies blood and oxygen to all parts of the body,the heart is found in almost all animals. It is about the size of a clenched fist, weighs about 10.5 ounces and is shaped like a cone. The heart is located in the chest cavity just posterior to the breastbone, between the lungs and superior to the diaphragm. The heart is also the strongest muscle in your body, five and six thousands quarts of blood are pumped each day in your body.


The_heart.jpg
Heart Functions
From: 3.1 Reading - Textbook page 68

How does the heart work?

"The animation shows how blood flows through the heart as it contracts and relaxes"(nhlbi)
- The left side of the heart works much harder than

the right because its function is to pump the blood throughout the body.

- The right side pumps the blood to the lungs to be oxygenated, whereupon

it returns to the heart (left side) to be pumped throughout the body.

- To create the pressure needed to perform this function, the left ventricle is much thicker and more muscular.

From: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/hhw/hhw_pumping.html

How to draw a heart ?





















Parts of a Heart (Oracle):

Designated part of the heart
Location
What it does
Atrium
The upper chambers of the heart
There are two different atriums, the right atrium and the left atrium. The right atrium receives the deoxygenated blood from the Vena Cava while the left atrium receives the oxygenated blood from the lungs and pump it to the left ventricle.
Ventricle
The two lower chambers on both sides of your heart.
The ventricles pumps the blood. The right ventricle received blood from the right atrium pumps the blood from the pulmonary system (the heart to the lungs), here the blood pick up oxygen in the lungs and get deliver back to the heart via the pulmonary vein. The left vertical pumps the oxygenated blood collected from the lungs out through the body.
Venae Cavae
Main vein in your body that carries blood from your body to the right side of the heart.
The venae cavae are the two biggest veins in the body which returns the deoxygenated blood from the body and into the heart so that it can be emptied into the right atrium. The blood then get more oxygen from the lungs and travel throughout the body again to continue the cardiac cycle.
Aorta
The main vessel artery and carries rich oxygen from the left side of your heart all over your body.
The Aorta carries the blood away from the heart. The aorta come out from the left ventricle and branch out down to the abdomen. The main function of the aorta is to carry and distribute blood through out the body, the aorta transfer the blood to some of the main arteries of the body
Heart chambers
Heart chambers

a diagram of a heart to show where each specific part lies
http://healthguide.howstuffworks.com/heart-chambers-picture.htm

Why is it that your heart is always beating but never gets tired?
The heart starts beating before your born and does stop until you die. The reason why the heart has such an endurance and doesnt get sore or tired is because the muscles that the heart is made of is different from the muscles that are regularly working.
Both cardiac muscle (the heart) and skeletal muscles (other muscles) get their energy from mitochondria, the organelle inside of cells that converts glucose to energy. The more mitochondria a muscle has, the more energy it will have. Skeletal muscles are only 1-2% mitochondria, while the cardiac muscle is between 30-35% mitochondria, thus it has much more energy. This is because of evolution, as humans do not need to be able to flex skeletal muscles for prolonged periods at a time, while hearts need to beat constantly.

Why does the left side have a wall that is so much thicker than the right side?
The left side of the heart works much harder than the right because its function is to pump the blood throughout the body. The right side pumps the blood to the lungs to be oxygenated, whereupon it returns to the heart (left side) to be pumped throughout the body. To create the pressure needed to perform this function, the left ventricle is much thicker and more muscular.



tgefd.PNGThe blue indicating, oxydised blood
http://wikieducator.org/Circulation_Worksheet_Answers



What is the pacemaker?This helps pumping blood throughout the body.A pacemaker can either be a natural one that is part of your heart, or an artificial one that is used to replace your natural pacemaker when it’s damagedd.jpgds.jpg
Artifical Pacemaker
Artifical Pacemaker

From (picture #1): <http://www.highbloodpressuresymptoms.co.uk/Pacemaker-defibrillator-risks-pacemaker-types.htm>.

From (picture #2): <http://www.cardioassoc.com/patient_pgs/procedures/pacemaker.asp>.

From (picture #3):<http://www.topnews.in/natural-solution-artificial-heart-pacemakers-may-be-possible-2149999>



What is the job of the heart?How does the heart get fed?
The heart is a muscle,the job of a heart is to pump blood around our body and bring it to other parts of the body , the heart is the life line of the body.
The heart is fed through blood, it give out everything the heart needs such as nutrients and oxygen.


What is the job of the coronary artery?How does the blood entering the coronary artery?T

CoronaryArteries.jpg
Diagrams Specifying Cotonary Artery Position
he coronary arteries is how the heart muscle(myocardiam) gets oxygen and nutrient. Coronary arties are seperated into two main coronary arteries, the left coronary artery and the right coronary artery. The right coronary artery gives oxygenated blood to the ventricles wall and the atrium, the left coronary artery give oxygenated blood to the anterior and the left circumflex. Coronary circulation is a circulation of blood in the heart muscles. The blood vessels which delivers ixygen is called the coronary arteries and the one that remove the deoxygenated is called the cardiac veins.



an overview of the heart
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FY9HfOfG6h0&feature=related


Describe coronary heart disease

Coronary heart disease is when your coronary arteries get damaged. These arteries, branching off from the aorta, are responsible for delivering the heart muscle’s blood supply. The coronary arteries play a significant role in providing the heart with necessary blood full of oxygen and nutrients such as glucose. Therefore, dysfunction in the coronary arteries would have a very negative impact on the heart and the entire human body. The coronary heart disease is the result of such. When there is build-up of plaque (which is made up of cholesterol and other cells) in the inner walls of the artery, the coronary arteries become narrowed or blocked. This is very fatal, as the supply of blood possible of being delivered to the heart muscle is lessened or cut-off altogether. If the arteries are narrowed, then there are no symptoms during rest. However, when the body is performing some action such as running, the heart muscle needs the supply of oxygen that the narrow arteries are incapable of supporting, resulting in chest pain or struggle in breathing. When the arteries are fully blocked, the heart muscle would be deprived of necessary oxygen and glucose. A heart attack would result when part of the heart muscle stops contracting. Other parts of the body would be negatively affected too, as these tissues would not be receiving the oxygen and nutrients that the heart pumps around. The results of these arteries becoming completely blocked also includes electrical pulses that lead to ventricular fibrillation. This is when the rhythm of the heart is severely irregular and, if not dealt with accordingly, can result in death.

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For the left-side picture
link:
http://healthyheart-sundar.blogspot.com/2011/04/pathophysiology-of-coronary-artery.html



Video showing you how coronary heart disease happen
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_OQWfGvanQ




Works Cited

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"Animation of Human Heart Beating." National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Web. 25 May 2011. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/hhw/hhw_pumping.html.

"Answers.com - What Is the Function the Ventricles." WikiAnswers - The Q&A Wiki. Web. 25 May 2011.http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_function_the_ventricles#ixzz1NESiyYtD.



"Aorta." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aorta."

"Atrium (heart)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atrium_(heart)."



Celli, Beth. "Why Are the Walls of the Ventricles Much Thicker Than the Walls of the Atria? | EHow.com." EHow | How to Videos, Articles & More - Trusted Advice for the Curious Life | EHow.com. Web. 25 May 2011. http://www.ehow.com/about_5444919_walls-much-thicker-walls-atria.html.

Clinic, Cleverland. "How Does Blood Flow through the Heart?" Cleverland Clinic. 2010. Web. 25 May 2011.
<http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/heartworks/bloodflow.aspx>.

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"Natural Solution to Artificial Heart Pacemakers May Be Possible | TopNews." TopNews | Only Top Stories of the Day. Web. 30 May 2011. <http://www.topnews.in/natural-solution-artificial-heart-pacemakers-may-be-possible-2149999>.

Orem, William. "Why Doesn’t Your Heart Get Tired? | A Moment of Science - Indiana Public Media." Indiana Public Media | News and Information, Music, Arts and Community Events from WFIU and WTIU. 9 Apr. 2009. Web. 30 May 2011. http://indianapublicmedia.org/amomentofscience/why-doesnt-your-heart-get-tired/.

Staff, Mayo Clinic. "Coronary Artery Disease - MayoClinic.com." Mayo Clinic. 2009. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/coronary-artery-disease/DS00064>.

"The Geology of the Human Heart." Planet Earth Online Homepage. Web. 25 May 2011. http://planetearth.nerc.ac.uk/news/story.aspx?id=369.


"The Geology of the Human Heart." Planet Earth Online Homepage. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://planetearth.nerc.ac.uk/news/story.aspx?id=369>.

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"Venae Cavae." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vena_cava."

"Ventricle (heart)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventricle_(heart)."

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