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Thursday, June 2

  1. page (d) The heart edited ... Atrium The upper chambers of the heart ... deoxygenated blood from the Vena Cava while t…
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    Atrium
    The upper chambers of the heart
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    deoxygenated blood from the Vena Cava while the
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    the oxygenated blood.blood from the lungs and pump it to the left ventricle.
    Ventricle
    The two lower chambers on both sides of your heart.
    ...
    right ventricle received blood from the right atrium pumps the
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    to the lungs)lungs), here the blood pick up oxygen in the lungs and get deliver back to the heart via the pulmonary vein. The left ventriclevertical pumps the oxygenated blood collected
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    the body.
    Vena Vena

    Venae Cavae

    Main vein in your body that carries blood from your body to the right side of the heart.
    The vena cavavenae cavae are the two biggest veins in the body which returns
    ...
    right atrium. The blood then get more oxygen from the lungs and travel throughout the body again to continue the cardiac cycle.
    Aorta
    The main vessel artery and carries rich oxygen from the left side of your heart all over your body.
    ...
    the blood away from the heart intoheart. The aorta come out from the left ventricle and branch out down to the abdomen. The main function of the aorta is to carry and distribute blood through out the body, the aorta transfer the blood to some of the main arteries of the body
    {http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/adam/images/en/heart-chambers-picture.jpg} Heart chambers
    a diagram of a heart to show where each specific part lies
    (view changes)
    8:51 am

Wednesday, June 1

  1. page (d) The heart edited ... The main vessel artery and carries rich oxygen from the left side of your heart all over your …
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    The main vessel artery and carries rich oxygen from the left side of your heart all over your body.
    The Aorta carries the blood from the heart into the left ventricle
    {http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/adam/images/en/heart-chambers-picture.jpg} Heart chambers
    a diagram of a heart to show where each specific part lies
    http://healthguide.howstuffworks.com/heart-chambers-picture.htm

    Why is it that your heart is always beating but never gets tired?
    The heart starts beating before your born and does stop until you die. The reason why the heart has such an endurance and doesnt get sore or tired is because the muscles that the heart is made of is different from the muscles that are regularly working.
    ...
    What is the job of the heart?How does the heart get fed?
    The heart is a muscle,the job of a heart is to pump blood around our body and bring it to other parts of the body , the heart is the life line of the body.
    It collects de-oxygenated blood inside the right atrium and pumps it into the lungs to collect oxygen. While the left atrium collects the oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out throughout the body. TheThe heart is
    
    What is the job of the coronary artery?How does the blood entering the coronary artery?T
    {CoronaryArteries.jpg} Diagrams Specifying Cotonary Artery Positionhe coronary arteries is how the heart muscle(myocardiam) gets oxygen and nutrient. Coronary arties are seperated into two main coronary arteries, the left coronary artery and the right coronary artery. The right coronary artery gives oxygenated blood to the ventricles wall and the atrium, the left coronary artery give oxygenated blood to the anterior and the left circumflex. Coronary circulation is a circulation of blood in the heart muscles. The blood vessels which delivers ixygen is called the coronary arteries and the one that remove the deoxygenated is called the cardiac veins.
    .an overview of the heart
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FY9HfOfG6h0&feature=related

    Describe coronary heart disease
    Coronary heart disease is when your coronary arteries get damaged. These arteries, branching off from the aorta, are responsible for delivering the heart muscle’s blood supply. The coronary arteries play a significant role in providing the heart with necessary blood full of oxygen and nutrients such as glucose. Therefore, dysfunction in the coronary arteries would have a very negative impact on the heart and the entire human body. The coronary heart disease is the result of such. When there is build-up of plaque (which is made up of cholesterol and other cells) in the inner walls of the artery, the coronary arteries become narrowed or blocked. This is very fatal, as the supply of blood possible of being delivered to the heart muscle is lessened or cut-off altogether. If the arteries are narrowed, then there are no symptoms during rest. However, when the body is performing some action such as running, the heart muscle needs the supply of oxygen that the narrow arteries are incapable of supporting, resulting in chest pain or struggle in breathing. When the arteries are fully blocked, the heart muscle would be deprived of necessary oxygen and glucose. A heart attack would result when part of the heart muscle stops contracting. Other parts of the body would be negatively affected too, as these tissues would not be receiving the oxygen and nutrients that the heart pumps around. The results of these arteries becoming completely blocked also includes electrical pulses that lead to ventricular fibrillation. This is when the rhythm of the heart is severely irregular and, if not dealt with accordingly, can result in death.
    {bio_snip_arteries.gif}
    Image Contrasting the Differences between the Normal Artery and the Narrowed Artery (What is)

    {dsfsefsd.PNG} {sdfsdf.PNG}
    For the left-side picture
    link:
    http://healthyheart-sundar.blogspot.com/2011/04/pathophysiology-of-coronary-artery.html
    Video showing you how coronary heart disease happen
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_OQWfGvanQ

    Works Cited
    "Anatomy of the Heart: Valves." Biology. Web. 25 May 2011. http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/a/aa062207a.htm.
    ...
    25 May 2011.http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/hhw/hhw_pumping.html.2011. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/hhw/hhw_pumping.html.
    "Answers.com - What Is the Function the Ventricles." WikiAnswers - The Q&A Wiki. Web. 25 May 2011.http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_function_the_ventricles#ixzz1NESiyYtD.
    "Aorta." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aorta."
    "Atrium (heart)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atrium_(heart)."
    Celli, Beth. "Why Are the Walls of the Ventricles Much Thicker Than the Walls of the Atria? | EHow.com." EHow | How to Videos, Articles & More - Trusted Advice for the Curious Life | EHow.com. Web. 25 May 2011. http://www.ehow.com/about_5444919_walls-much-thicker-walls-atria.html.
    "Circulation Worksheet Answers." WikiEducator. Web. 31 May 2011. http://wikieducator.org/Circulation_Worksheet_Answers.
    Clinic,
    Clinic, Cleverland. "How
    ...
    25 May 2011.<http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/heartworks/bloodflow.aspx>.2011.
    <http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/heartworks/bloodflow.aspx>.

    "Coronary Arteries." Biology. Web. 24 May 2011. <http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/ss/Coronary-Arteries.htm>.
    "Coronary Circulation." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronary_circulation>.
    "Geology of the Human Heart, The." Planet Earth Online Homepage. Web. 25 May 2011. http://planetearth.nerc.ac.uk/news/story.aspx?id=369.
    "Heart." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart>.
    "Heart, The" Biology. Web. 25 May 2011. http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/a/theheart.htm.
    "Natural
    "Natural Solution to
    ...
    Web. 30 May 2011.http://www.topnews.in/natural-solution-artificial-heart-pacemakers-may-be-possible-2149999.
    Oracle. N.p., n.d. Web. 31
    May 2011. http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/ 00724/heart.html.<http://www.topnews.in/natural-solution-artificial-heart-pacemakers-may-be-possible-2149999>.
    Orem, William. "Why Doesn’t Your Heart Get Tired? | A Moment of Science - Indiana Public Media." Indiana Public Media | News and Information, Music, Arts and Community Events from WFIU and WTIU. 9 Apr. 2009. Web. 30 May 2011. http://indianapublicmedia.org/amomentofscience/why-doesnt-your-heart-get-tired/.
    Staff, Mayo Clinic. "Coronary Artery Disease - MayoClinic.com." Mayo Clinic. 2009. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/coronary-artery-disease/DS00064>.
    "The Geology of the Human Heart." Planet Earth Online Homepage. Web. 25 May 2011. http://planetearth.nerc.ac.uk/news/story.aspx?id=369.
    "The Geology of the Human Heart." Planet Earth Online Homepage. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://planetearth.nerc.ac.uk/news/story.aspx?id=369>.
    "The Heart." Biology. Web. 25 May 2011. http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/a/theheart.htm.

    "Venae Cavae." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vena_cava."
    ...
    31 May
    2011.
    2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventricle_(heart)."
    "What Are the Coronary Arteries?" Cleveland Clinic. 2009. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/cad/cad_arteries.aspx>.
    "What Is Coronary Heart Disease?" National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Web. 30 May 2011. <http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/hhw/hhw_pumping.htm>.
    "Your Heart & Circulatory System." KidsHealth - the eb's Most Visited Site about Children's Health. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://kidshealth.org/kid/htbw/heart.html>.
    Oracle. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 May 2011. http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/ 00724/heart.html.
    "Circulation Worksheet Answers." WikiEducator. Web. 31 May 2011. http://wikieducator.org/Circulation_Worksheet_Answers.

    (view changes)
    10:25 pm
  2. page (b) The Human Defense systems in the blood edited ... What happens if we get infected? There are many ways for the microbes to get inside our body;…
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    What happens if we get infected?
    There are many ways for the microbes to get inside our body; one of the many ways is infection. When there’s a cut on our body, the invaders (microbes) will then enter the body since there are billions of harmful invaders (microbes) surrounding us, this will cause cells in our body to be destroyed. The dying cells will then activate an automatic response called inflammation, this will cause dilated blood vessels and increased blood flow. When the inflammation is turned off, it wills eventually draws defensive cells to the cut/damaged area. Another cause of the inflammation is the increase blood flow. The increase of blood flow helps the defensive cells (immune cells) reach where they need to be.
    work cited:
    "Introduction - Your Immune System - Dana Foundation." Brain and Brain Research Information - Dana Foundation. Web. 25 May 2011. http://www.dana.org/news/publications/detail.aspx?id=4294.
    "The Human Defense System." Bakersfield College. Web. 25 May 2011.
    http://www2.bakersfieldcollege.edu/bio16/15_innate_immune.htm.
    "Phagocytosis." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 25 May 2011.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phagocytosis.
    "Discussion of the Human Body Defense System." Emaxhealth: Daily Health News. Web. 25 May 2011. http://www.emaxhealth.com/34/201.html.
    "Immune System." Aplastic Anemia - Patient Forum & Resource Site. Web. 29 May 2011. http://aplasticcentral.com/Aplastic_Facts/Aplastic_Immune_System.htm.
    {After_4.PNG}
    (view changes)
    7:26 am
  3. file After_4.PNG uploaded
    7:25 am
  4. page (a) The circulatory system and its components edited ... Work Cited: {final_phong.PNG} "The (1) Download the Introduction to circulatory sys…
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    Work Cited:
    {final_phong.PNG}
    "The
    (1) Download the Introduction to circulatory systems worksheet. Answer questions 1 -2d (not 2d) to create good clear information here.
    (2) Download the Human Circulatory system worksheet. Create good notes, diagrams and information here, based on these questions
    Note you will need to paste these links into your browser, as they do not seem to work from here

    (view changes)
    4:55 am
  5. page (d) The heart edited ... Works Cited "Anatomy of the Heart: Valves." Biology. Web. 25 May 2011. http://biolo…
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    Works Cited
    "Anatomy of the Heart: Valves." Biology. Web. 25 May 2011. http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/a/aa062207a.htm.
    ...
    25 May 2011. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/hhw/hhw_pumping.html.2011.http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/hhw/hhw_pumping.html.
    "Answers.com - What Is the Function the Ventricles." WikiAnswers - The Q&A Wiki. Web. 25 May 2011.http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_function_the_ventricles#ixzz1NESiyYtD.
    "Aorta." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aorta."
    ...
    "Heart." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart>.
    "Heart, The" Biology. Web. 25 May 2011. http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/a/theheart.htm.
    ...
    30 May 2011. http://www.topnews.in/natural-solution-artificial-heart-pacemakers-may-be-possible-2149999.2011.http://www.topnews.in/natural-solution-artificial-heart-pacemakers-may-be-possible-2149999.
    Oracle. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 May 2011. http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/ 00724/heart.html.
    Orem, William. "Why Doesn’t Your Heart Get Tired? | A Moment of Science - Indiana Public Media." Indiana Public Media | News and Information, Music, Arts and Community Events from WFIU and WTIU. 9 Apr. 2009. Web. 30 May 2011. http://indianapublicmedia.org/amomentofscience/why-doesnt-your-heart-get-tired/.
    Staff, Mayo Clinic. "Coronary Artery Disease - MayoClinic.com." Mayo Clinic. 2009. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/coronary-artery-disease/DS00064>.
    "Venae Cavae." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vena_cava."
    ...
    31 May 2011.
    2011.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventricle_(heart)."
    "What Are the Coronary Arteries?" Cleveland Clinic. 2009. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/cad/cad_arteries.aspx>.
    "What Is Coronary Heart Disease?" National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Web. 30 May 2011. <http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/hhw/hhw_pumping.htm>.
    (view changes)
    2:44 am
  6. page (c) Immunity and vaccination edited ... "Pac-man's Past." Animeradius. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 May 2011. http://animeradius.com/…
    ...
    "Pac-man's Past." Animeradius. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 May 2011.
    http://animeradius.com/2011/03/pacmans-past/.
    Our immune system
    Our body creates a defense system to the response to infection by a germ. There are two main stages of this defense: the innate immune response and the adaptive immune response. The first is a general immune response and the adaptive immune response is a more specific targeted attack on the germ.
    Adaptive immune response
    Adaptive immune response refers to the response that happens that has had enough time to recognize the germ causing the infection and can target it’s action specifically to that particular type of germ. An action that is targeted is more efficient and effective than the general innate response above. There are two different types of adaptive immunity:
    - Cellular immunity: White blood cells are made to specifically target the invading germs
    - Humoral immunity: This is when the system specified a special substance in the surface of invading germs which is antigens. As we already know, it then produces its own chemicals known as antibodies to specifically target the antigens and inactivate them. Antibodies marked the germs for destruction by white blood cells.

    Same same but different?
    B-lymphocyte and a T-lymphocyte (Difference between T - lymphocyte):
    ...
    "Primary and Secondary Immune Response." WWW.Molecular-Plant-Biotechnology.info . N.p., n.d. Web. 25 May 2011. [[http://www.molecular-plant-biotechnology.info/animal-biotechnology/ primary-and-secondary-immune-response.htm]].
    "Pathogen." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 31 May 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathogen."
    ...
    May 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/howvpd.htm.http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/howvpd.htm
    "Answers.com - What Is Immunity." WikiAnswers - The Q&A Wiki. Web. 29 May 2011. <http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_immunity>.
    Pham, Trung and Jae Hyun, Park. “Immunity and Vaccination.” Wikispace. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 June 2011.
    http://circsystemsunsig09r3a.wikispaces.com/‌%28c%29%09+Immunity+and+vaccination.

    (view changes)
    2:39 am

Tuesday, May 31

  1. page (b) The Human Defence System edited ... {http://stemcells.nih.gov/StaticResources/info/scireport/images/figure61.jpg} "6. Autoi…
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    {http://stemcells.nih.gov/StaticResources/info/scireport/images/figure61.jpg}
    "6. Autoimmune Diseases and the Promise of Stem Cell-Based Therapies [Stem Cell Information]." NIH Stem Cell Information Home Page. Web. 30 May 2011. <http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/scireport/chapter6.asp>.
    Purpose of each type of immunity
    1st line of defence
    Innate immunity
    2nd line of defence
    Adaptive immunity
    3rd line of defence
    Passive and Active immunity
    The innate immunity system is the basic resistance the body possesses against diseases and infections. It acts as the 1st line of defence, preventing disease-causing microbes called pathogens from entering the body. This system consists of physical barriers such as the skin or the mucous lining.
    The adaptive immunity system protects the body from re-exposure to a pathogen that already attacked the body once before. This system develops as people are exposed to more diseases or as people become immunized against diseases by vaccinations. Cells that are responsible for this include white blood cells called macrophages and granulocytes or natural killer (NK) cells
    The passive immunity system manufactures antibodies called lymphocytes (particularly the B cells and T cells) that destroy pathogens such as virus-infected cells or other damaged, dysfunctional cells.
    Differences between the first types of immunity
    1st line of defence
    Innate immunity
    2nd line of defence
    Adaptive immunity
    Reaction rate to invading organism
    This type of immunity is always ready to do their job when they detect infection.
    This type of immunity takes some time before it can react.
    Response specificity
    Non-specific
    Specific
    This type of immunity serves as a barrier that is not specific in what it blocks. It does not antigen-specific and reacts well with different organisms alike.
    The lymphocytes involved in this type of immunity identify specific pathogens that have been encountered before. The lymphocytes then make specific antibodies for those pathogens.
    Immunological memory
    No
    Yes
    This type of immunity does not exhibit immunological memory.
    This type of immunity can remember how to respond to pathogens that it has encountered before, hence its name “adaptive” immunity.

    Make sure your answer includes
    § What each line is
    (view changes)
    11:37 pm

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